Images & Information

Image Gallery Slideshow

A comparison between a circumcised and uncircumcised penis in the flaccid state. The anatomically of the intact male. His penis is flaccid and his glans is covered, as usual, by his foreskin. The gradual retraction of the foreskin, from total coverage (top left) to full retraction upon erection (bottom right). An intact penis upon erection. Though the foreskin retracts behind the glans during erection, there is still a lot of skin available on the penis, allowing the foreskin to glide up and back down over the glans. The intact penis with foreskin retracted. Notice the sensitive, shiny, moist quality of the glans, which is so because it has been protected by the foreskin from contact with outside elements. The penis on the left is intact, like those above. The penis on the right has been circumcised some time ago. Notice how the glans is unprotected and has dried out and hardened (“keratinised”) due to constant contact with external abrasion. Another circumcised penis. The glans, once again, is dried out and bears signs of keratinisation. The circumcision scar is plainly visible beneath the glans around the entire shaft. There is little skin available for expansion of the penis to occur.

Penile Anatomy: The Intact Penis

Figure 1

The anatomically of the intact male. His penis is flaccid and his glans is covered, as usual, by his foreskin.

The anatomically of the intact male


Figure 2

The gradual retraction of the foreskin, from total coverage (top left) to full retraction upon erection (bottom right).

The gradual retraction of the foreskin


Figure 3

An intact penis upon erection. Though the foreskin retracts behind the glans during erection, there is still a lot of skin available on the penis, allowing the foreskin to glide up and back down over the glans. The intact model in the photo is demonstrating this by rolling the foreskin up onto the glans. This is the action generating the primary erogenous response in intact males. It is, sadly, not possible after circumcision.

An intact penis upon erection


Figure 4

The intact penis with foreskin retracted. Notice the sensitive, shiny, moist quality of the glans, which is so because it has been protected by the foreskin from contact with outside elements. The foreskin is made up of almost all the skin visible on the shaft of the penis, which when returned over the glans will cover it wholly. The average foreskin comprises 12.5cm x 9cm (5″ x 3″) of tissue.

The intact penis with foreskin retracted.
© RichieX


Comparison with the Circumcised Penis

Figure 5

Side by side 3d comparison of circumcised and intact penis.

Figure 6

The penis on the left is intact, like those above. The penis on the right has been circumcised some time ago. Notice how the glans is unprotected and has dried out and hardened (“keratinised”) due to constant contact with external abrasion.

Comparison between an intact and circumcised penis head


Figure 7

Another circumcised penis. The glans, once again, is dried out and bears signs of keratinisation. The circumcision scar is plainly visible beneath the glans around the entire shaft. There is little skin available for expansion of the penis to occur upon erection, and will therefore become very tight once erect

Another circumcised penis
© RichieX

 


Featured Publications

  • The Good Men Project
  • Motherboard at Vice.com
  • Men's Health
  • The Telegraph
  • Towleroad

Translate Site

Contact Us

Foregen
Fong & Associates, CPAs
2790 Skypark Drive, Suite 306
Torrance, CA 90505
Tel:(310) 507-7475
Circumcision penis foreskin
Foregen Italy
Via Antonio Locatelli 5,
00136 Rome, Italy